Æbleskiver and Gløgg

My aunt Sarah was from on the small island of Ærø, where my father was born and my grandfather lived all his life. She was the only member of my family that made these æbleskiver, which are like light doughnuts with a nice sour surprise in the centre. I’m afraid you’ll need a special pan, but you can buy it easily online.

Everybody serves gløgg in December, so this is when you really start to appreciate a homemade, not-too-sweet version.

Serves
8 people

Ingredients

ÆBLESKIVER
40g fresh yeast (or 15g dried yeast if you really have to!)
800ml lukewarm whole milk
600g plain flour
2.5 tsp salt
1.5 tsp ground cardamom
2 vanilla pods
3 tbsp caster sugar
4 eggs, separated
2 apples
100–150g salted butter

To serve
icing sugar raspberry jam

GLØGG
750ml bottle of red wine
250ml Gløgg Extract
150g blanched almonds, coarsely chopped
150g raisins

Method – Æbleskiver

DISSOLVE THE YEAST IN THE MILK IN A LARGE BOWL. In another mixing bowl, sift together the flour, salt and cardamom. Slit the vanilla pods lengthways, scrape out the seeds with the tip of a knife and add them to the dry ingredients with the sugar. Whisk the eggs yolks into the milk mixture. Add the dry ingredients and beat to make a dough.

IN A SEPARATE BOWL, whisk the egg whites until stiff, then fold them into the dough. Leave to stand for 40 minutes.

PEEL AND CORE THE APPLES AND CUT INTO 1CM CUBES. Heat the æbleskiver pan over a medium heat. Put a little butter in each indentation and, when it has melted, pour in some of the batter. Place a piece of apple in each and cook for three to five minutes, or until golden underneath, then turn the doughnuts over.

CONTINUE FRYING FOR ABOUT FOUR TO FIVE MINUTES or until golden, then remove from the pan. Repeat with the remaining batter. Dust with icing sugar and serve immediately with raspberry jam.

Method – Gløgg

COMBINE THE WINE, Gløgg Extract, almonds and raisins in a saucepan. Heat for 10 minutes over a low heat, without boiling.

SERVE IN GLASSES, with teaspoons for catching the raisins and almonds.

PHOTO BY Lars Ranek

Trine Hahnemann